Real-world safety profile of abiraterone acetate in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and cardiovascular comorbidities: a retrospective, single center study

 

  • Giovanni Fuca Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
  • Elena Verzoni Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
  • Alessia Mennitto Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
  • Michele Prisciandaro Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
  • Raffaele Ratta Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.
  • Giuseppe Procopio Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Background: Abiraterone acetate became a referral treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in a post-docetaxel setting despite a remarkable percentage of cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). As a consequence, the evaluation of cardiovascular safety in patients at risk should be mandatory. We aimed to assess the cardiovascular safety of abiraterone acetate in a real-world series of mCRPC patients treated at our institution.

Materials and Methods: We retrospectively included mCRPC patients with at least 1 active cardiovascular comorbidity or risk factor according to the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines and who started treatment with abiraterone acetate from April 2011 to July 2012. Cardiac assessment with electrocardiogram and echocardiogram was performed at baseline and at treatment discontinuation. AEs were defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Statistical analyses were performed by descriptive statistics as appropriate.

Results: We included 51 patients of whom 18% had an ESC score risk for a major cardiovascular event ≥4%. At a median follow-up of 36 months, no cardiac AEs (rhythm abnormalities or left ventricular function decrease) were observed. The most frequent grade 1-2 AE reported was fluid retention (18%) followed by hypertension and asthenia (16%). The most frequent grade 3-4 AEs were asthenia and pruritus/rash. No patients discontinued abiraterone because of toxicity.

Conclusions: Abiraterone acetate showed a favorable safety profile in mCRPC patients with cardiovascular comorbidities or risk factors in a post-docetaxel setting, but further studies are needed to confirm our findings and to explore other settings of disease.

Published
2017-12-15
Section
Clinical original article